Timelapse video shows how A14 upgrade team installed new 1,000-tonne bridges at Bar Hill

PUBLISHED: 00:07 19 September 2018 | UPDATED: 00:14 19 September 2018

The transporter delivers the first section of bridge to uprights and has now been dropped to be able to withdrawn. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

The transporter delivers the first section of bridge to uprights and has now been dropped to be able to withdrawn. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

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Project using giant remote-controlled platform on wheels completed ahead of time

The A14 upgrade crew worked through Friday night from 9pm to lay a temporary level surface on the A14 carriageways to enable the transporter to travel on an even surface. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP PhotographicThe A14 upgrade crew worked through Friday night from 9pm to lay a temporary level surface on the A14 carriageways to enable the transporter to travel on an even surface. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

This timelapse video shows how the team working on the A14 upgrade project moved two 1,000-tonne bridges into place over the A14 at Bar Hill using a giant remote-controlled platform on wheels.

The A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon upgrade team closed the road at Bar Hill at 9pm on Friday following several months of preparation, during which the bridges were built nearby.

With diversions in place, the team then had a race against time to lift the 44-metre bridges on top of four abutments by 6am on Monday, when the road was due to reopen.

A14 looking towards Huntingdon, much of the traffic was caused by those coming from the A14 west and having to turn around at Bar Hill, delaying those coming from the A14 East. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP PhotographicA14 looking towards Huntingdon, much of the traffic was caused by those coming from the A14 west and having to turn around at Bar Hill, delaying those coming from the A14 East. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

A giant transporter was used to shift the bridges, with temporary tarmac laid for it to roll on.

And despite its top speed of 1mph, the work was completed and the road reopened early - by midday on Sunday (September 16, 2018), in fact.

Julian Lamb, construction director for the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon scheme on behalf of Highways England, said: “I’m delighted we were able to reopen the A14 ahead of schedule. The work has been long in the planning and I’m pleased to say went ahead smoothly.

Work on the large sections of new bridge being put into place at Bar Hill.  Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP PhotographicWork on the large sections of new bridge being put into place at Bar Hill. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

“I would like to thank motorists, businesses and residents, especially in Bar Hill, Longstanton, Willingham and surrounding villages, for their patience.”

The new bridges, part of the £1.5billion upgrade scheme, will form an improved Bar Hill junction connecting the A14 to the future local access road between Cambridge and Huntingdon, as well as to the existing B1050 between Bar Hill and Longstanton.

The old bridge will be demolished in 2019.

Work on the large sections of new bridge being put into place at Bar Hill.  Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP PhotographicWork on the large sections of new bridge being put into place at Bar Hill. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

The 21-mile A14 scheme involves 34 bridges and main structures. It will convert the A14 between Cambridge and Huntingdon to three lanes in each direction, including a 17-mile bypass south of Huntingdon, with four lanes each way between Bar Hill and Girton.

The project should cut 20 minutes off journey times.

Last week, the Cambridge Independent reported how Highways England is applying to the government to give the stretch from Girton to the A1(M) at Brampton Hut motorway status. If approved, it will prevent slow-moving vehicles using the stretch of road and enable the use of variable speed limits. The stretch, which would be called the A14(M), would mean there is unbroken motorway from London to Peterborough.

The second bridge section awaiting being picked up by the transporter on Saturday afternoon. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP PhotographicThe second bridge section awaiting being picked up by the transporter on Saturday afternoon. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

Read more

Diversions on A14 this weekend as two 1,000-tonne bridges are moved into place

The transporter being driven back to pick up the second bridge section, all controld by a single man with a wired control. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP PhotographicThe transporter being driven back to pick up the second bridge section, all controld by a single man with a wired control. Picture: Paul Sanwell - OP Photographic

18-mile section of upgraded A14 set to become new Cambridgeshire motorway called A14(M)

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