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First quantum operating system ARTIQ-ulated by Riverlane



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An early Deltaflow.OS dashboard
An early Deltaflow.OS dashboard

Riverlane’s initial version of its quantum operating system, Deltaflow.OS – full name Deltaflow-on-ARTIQ – becomes freely available to the public today (December 2).

“This milestone is a significant step towards our goal of making a quantum operating system that is both hardware- and platform-agnostic, and a product that will help to accelerate progress towards quantum advantage,” said a spokesperson for the St Andrew’s House company.

In May, Riverlane was announced as the lead partner in a consortium which was awarded a £7.6m grant to build a radically new operating system for quantum computers.

The first successful trials of Deltaflow.OS took place in September, using quantum hardware belonging to leading trapped-ion company, Oxford Ionics.

A first public demonstration of Deltaflow.OS took place at the virtual National Quantum Technologies Showcase on November 6, where the team demonstrated how a Rabi-Oscillation - which occurs where light interacts with a two-level system, for instance an atom or ion with a ground state and an excited state - would be performed.

The release of Deltaflow-on-ARTIQ marks a significant step towards Riverlane’s mission to build a quantum operating system that is high performance, portable across all qubit technologies and scalable to millions of qubits. By design, “Deltaflow.OS makes verification and debugging of FPGA designs within the quantum computing stack easier, accelerating R&D for hardware companies”.

Leonie Mueck, Riverlane’s chief product officer
Leonie Mueck, Riverlane’s chief product officer

The product is built primarily for hardware companies and Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund partners including Oxford Ionics, OQC, Hitachi, Universal Quantum, Arm and Duality Quantum Photonics. In principle, Deltaflow.OS is interesting for all quantum hardware companies worldwide. It “makes verification and debugging of FPGA designs within the quantum computing stack easier, accelerating R&D for hardware companies”.

Algorithm and app developers will be able to accelerate their research by making collaboration easier and reduce down-time in labs. In addition, Deltaflow “could be interesting for quantum application developers since it allows for implementing applications that are very hard to implement otherwise, such as applications that need local control, including quantum chemistry”.

Leonie Mueck, Riverlane’s chief product officer, said: “We are proud to keep Cambridge at the forefront of the computing industry.

“With our operating system, Deltaflow.OS, we are building the quantum computing stack from the bottom up. Our aim is to open the quantum computing ecosystem for the whole community to thrive.”

Instructions for how to access the product are available on the website.

“Essentially the code is freely available on Github and we will have team members on hand to provide technical support if needed,” adds Riverlane.



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