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Brexit message as University of Cambridge’s Prof Paul Dupree and Prof Steve Jackson named as 2019 Highly Cited Researchers




Two University of Cambridge scientists have been named as among the most influential researchers in the world - and responded with a message about Brexit.

Professor Paul Dupree and Professor Steve Jackson, of the Department of Biochemistry, were named as 2019 Highly Cited Researchers, as their research is among the top one per cent most cited worldwide.

Professor Paul Dupree, Cambridge University Biochemistry Dept . Picture: Keith Heppell. (22590947)
Professor Paul Dupree, Cambridge University Biochemistry Dept . Picture: Keith Heppell. (22590947)

Prof Dupree, who explores the extracellular matrix in plants and cell wall biosynthesis, said: “I am very proud once again in 2019 to be named a Highly Cited Researcher. This reflects the outstanding work of our group members over many years to produce reproducible, exciting findings addressing the big questions in science that directly impact society, such as sustainable energy and material resources, and improvement of our diet.”

He added: “The result of the Brexit referendum has caused uncertainty and stress amongst my team members from other EU countries.

“The UK must continue to attract the top students and researchers from elsewhere in the EU. We benefit in the UK from being fully integrated into many EU research programmes. The amazing high tech companies clustered around Cambridge are evidence of the impact top research in Cambridge has on job and wealth creation for the UK.”

Prof Steve Jackson, of the Wellcome / Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute (22591007)
Prof Steve Jackson, of the Wellcome / Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute (22591007)

Prof Jackson, head of the Gurdon Institute's Cancer Research UK labs and the Frederick James Quick professor of biology, studies how our genomes remain stable, through processes such as DNA damage response.

“It is a great honour to be on the list of 2019 Highly Cited Researchers,” he said. “This presumably reflects my laboratory's recent and past research publications having been well received by our peers in the research community.”

Read more

How Cambridge biochemist Prof Paul Dupree teamed up with his 80-year-old dad to solve plant mystery

Gurdon Institute research uncovers new genes responsible for genome stability

Prof Steve Jackson of Gurdon Institute wins prestigious European cancer research prize



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