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Cambridge Science Centre back with a bang as Bloodhound hits the trail




The Cambridge Science Centre enjoyed a jet-powered reopening with an exhibition on the Bloodhound LSR car, a spectacular mix of car and aircraft technology that aims to break the world land speed record.

The education module of the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham (40706202)
The education module of the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham (40706202)

The centre on Clifton Road had been closed to visitors due to the pandemic - though it was still reaching thousands of children in print and online - but it was back with a bang on Saturday, August 15.

This exhibition and workshop has allowed visitors to discover more about the five-part modular version of the Bloodhound LSR car which clocked 628mph in 2019 and aims to set a new world land speed record by pushing past the current 763mph mark to 1,000mph. Visitors have been exploring the design and engineering aspects in detail, seeing interviews with those who designed and built the car and learning about the history of the land speed record.

Sapphire Loveday-Lam, 8, and her mother, Becky Loveday, cut out parts for their model of the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham. (40706196)
Sapphire Loveday-Lam, 8, and her mother, Becky Loveday, cut out parts for their model of the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham. (40706196)

Helen Slaski, CEO, the centre’s CEO, said: “Our first shows with Bloodhound were outstanding. Our team are excited to be back presenting in the science centre and showcasing such a unique and exceptional feat of engineering, vision and passion.Bloodhound will stay with us until September 3 with pre-booked sessions available via our Eventbrite page.”

Andrew Farrer teaches visitors about the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham (40706205)
Andrew Farrer teaches visitors about the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham (40706205)

The charity exists to spark scientific curiosity, fuel self-belief in children, illuminate pathways into science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and careers, and showcase Cambridge science and innovation.

Helen said: “We have had amazing success over the lockdown period, connecting with over 36,000 children. This has been down to the incredible work of our staff – they have truly embraced huge changes to the way they work, learnt new skills and how to deliver our shows in completely different ways.

“We were quickly able to pivot our services to reach children at home via online resources and programmes – CSCOnline, via our website, and our Science@6 ‘show’ on Monday evening at 6pm via Facebook and YouTube.

“We have produced a hard copy magazine, OpenUpScience, which goes out to children who may not have access to the internet or prefer hard copy learning. This has been distributed via food banks, community groups and youth groups. We distribute around 1,500 per week. For teachers and schools, we produced a free Virtual School Trip video programme, an online version of our schools visit to the centre.”

Kaitlin, 8, left, and Zoe, 6 enjoy making a model of the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham (40706170)
Kaitlin, 8, left, and Zoe, 6 enjoy making a model of the Bloodhound LSR car. Picture: Richard Marsham (40706170)

The exhibition runs until Wednesday, September 3. Book at eventbrite.co.uk/e/bloodhound-exhibition-a-huge-engineering-adventure-tickets-115034539404 .

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