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Cambridgeshire in midst of rising Covid-19 wave - with 69% increase in cases and hospital admissions approaching peak



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Cambridgeshire is firmly in the grip of another Covid wave, with cases numbers up another 69 per cent in a week and Addenbrooke’s treating close to as many patients as it did during the winter peak.

Health chiefs in Cambridgeshire this week expressed alarm that free universal Covid testing is being withdrawn by the government from April 1.

There were 6,621 cases in Cambridgeshire in the week to March 13 - up 2,699 (68.8 per cent) on the previous week, during which there had also been a substantial rise.

Below, we look at every area and show how it is affected at a neighbourhood level.

The rapid rise in cases follows the decision to lift the legal requirement to self-isolate from February 24, although those testing positive are still urged to stay at home.

Meanwhile, the Covid-19 provisions within the Statutory Sick Pay and Employment and Support Allowance regulations end from March 24.

Cllr Richard Howitt, the Labour chair of Cambridgeshire County Council’s adult and health committee, warned this week: “I’m worried about the lifting of the testing regime and I’m worried that the extra help for poorer people to be able to isolate is being lost.

“These are national issues being discussed nationally, but I’m worried about that and its impact locally.”

The infection rate in Cambridgeshire has shot back up to 1,007.4 cases per 100,000 people for the seven days to March 18, compared to the national average of 724.3. Nationally, cases numbers have risen 38.1 per cent, patients admitted to hospital have risen 24.8 per cent and the number of deaths within 28 days of a positive test has risen by three per cent, week-on-week.

Our analysis shows large rises in case numbers among nearly all age groups.

The highest infection rate is found in five to nine-year-olds, but the age groups 30-34 and 40-44 are not far behind.

Cambridgeshire, excluding Peterborough, has now recorded:

  • 185,200 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 18, 2022
  • 7,372 in the seven days to March 18 according daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 1,021 deaths by March 18 within 28 days of a positive test, with the latest on March 17, 15, and 14
  • 1,195 deaths, as of March 4, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate.

Hospitalisations

Cambridge University Hospitals had 76 patients with Covid-19 patients on its wards on Friday (March 18), compared to 54 the previous Friday.

This was close to the Omicron peak over the winter and, along with emergency demand, has led to major strain on the hospital.

There are long waits in the emergency department and cancellations of some planned surgery.

At Royal Papworth, there were 11 Covid-19 patients on March 15, the same number as a week earlier. Five of them were in ventilation beds.

Vaccinations

More than 1.5 million Covid-19 jabs have been administered in Cambridgeshire, with 82.3 per cent of over-12s having received a first dose, 78.3 per cent having had a second and 64.8 per cent having received a third.

Jabs are available on a walk-on basis at all Cambridgeshire’s large-scale vaccination sites.

Booking is available if preferred via www.nhs.uk/covidvaccine.

Cambridge

Confirmed Covid-19 cases have shot up by two-thirds in a week in Cambridge.

There were 1,325 cases in the week to March 13, up 525 (65.6 per cent), taking the infection rate to 1,059.6 cases per 100,000 people.

Trumpington was worst affected, with 161 cases, up from 82 the previous week.

Cherry Hinton witnessed a trebling of cases, with 117 cases, up from 36.

Cambridge has recorded:

  • 38,123 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 18, 2022
  • 1,511 in the seven days to March 18, according daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 123 deaths by March 18 within 28 days of a positive test, including one on February 16, on on February 13, one on February 12 and one on February 11
  • 167 deaths, as of March 4, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate.

South Cambridgeshire

There was a rise of more than two-thirds in confirmed Covid-19 cases in South Cambridgeshire in the week to March 13.

There were 1,807 cases, up 737 (68.9 per cent) on the previous week, taking the infection rate to 1,123 cases per 100,000 people.

Worst affected were Linton and Balsham had 155 cases, compared to 75 the previous week.

South Cambridgeshire has recorded:

  • 45,557 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 18, 2022
  • 1,990 in the last seven days to March 18, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 209 deaths by March 18 within 28 days of a positive test, with the latest on March 17
  • 247 deaths, as of March 4, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

East Cambridgeshire

There was a 64.8 per cent rise in Covid-19 infections in East Cambridgeshire in the week to March 13, with 979 cases recorded, up 385.

The infection rate of 1,085.7 cases was well above the national average.

Worst hit was North Ely, with 179 cases, up from 108.

East Cambridgeshire has recorded:

  • 23,618 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 18, 2022
  • 1,064 cases in the seven days to March 18, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 106 deaths by March 18 within 28 days of a positive test, the latest of which was on February 28
  • 130 deaths, as of March 4, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

Huntingdonshire

The number of confirmed Covid-19 cases in Huntingdonshire was 1,764, up 735 (71.4 per cent) on the previous week.

The infection rate was 985.6 cases per 100,000 people, above the national average and the highest number of cases was seen in Brampton, the Stukeleys and the Alconburys, with 124, up from 71 the previous week.

Huntingdonshire has recorded:

  • 50,080 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 18, 2022
  • 1,895 cases in the seven days to March 18, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 318 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, with the latest on March 15
  • 361 deaths, as of March 4, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

Fenland

There was a rise of nearly three-quarters in the number of Covid-19 cases in Fenland in the week to March 13.

Some 746 cases were confirmed, up 317 (73.9 per cent) on the previous week, taking the infection rate to 730.8 cases per 100,000 people, which was similar to the national average.

Chatteris, with 115 cases, up from 54, was the worst affected area in the district.

Fenland has recorded:

  • 27,822 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 18, 2022
  • 912 cases in the seven days to March 11, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 265 deaths by March 18 within 28 days of a positive test, the latest of which was on March 14
  • 290 deaths, as of March 4, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

Peterborough

Covid-19 case numbers rose by more than a half in a week in Peterborough.

There were 1,347 cases, up 468 (53.2 per cent) on the previous week.

The infection rate of 664.8 cases per 100,000 people was below the national average, unlike any area of neighbouring Cambridgeshire.

No area had more than 100 cases - worst hit was Stanground, with 71.

Peterborough has recorded:

  • 68,912 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 18, 2022
  • 1,499 cases in the seven days to March 18, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 435 deaths by March 18 within 28 days of a positive test, including a death on March 12
  • 481 deaths, as of March 4, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

The global picture

Vaccinations by country

Hospitalisations

Variants

Read more

Rapid rise in Covid-19 cases in Cambridgeshire and increase in hospitalisations since lifting of restrictions

Deltacron Covid-19 variant identified as World Health Organization issues warning over scaling back of testing



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