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Cambridgeshire University Hospitals NHS Trust collects £1.2m in parking charges


By Adrian Curtis


Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust offers discounted parking for returning patients
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust offers discounted parking for returning patients

Patients' Association says the state of NHS finances are to blame

The entrance to Addenbrookes Hospital. Picture: Keith Heppell
The entrance to Addenbrookes Hospital. Picture: Keith Heppell

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs Addenbrooke’s, collected £1.2million in parking charges over the past year, new figures show.

Addenbrooke’s, along with hospitals in Southend, Colchester, Bedford, Ipswich and Milton Keynes, all made at least £1million, according to the data.

In total, more than £174million was collected by trusts across England – up six per cent on the year before.

Southend Hospital was the region’s biggest earner, raising £1.8million. Addenbrooke’s earned £1,198,297 in 2016/17, which was £42,303 more than in 2015/16.

Parking fines at the Cambridge hospital totalled £77,427 over the past year – an increase of £33,215 on the year before.

Rachel Power, chief executive of the Patients’ Association, said the state of NHS finances meant it was sometimes hard to blame hospitals for trying to find money. But she said that did not make the current situation acceptable.

“For patients, parking charges amount to an extra charge for being ill,” she said. “The increase in the number of trusts who are charging for disabled parking is particularly concerning.”

Addenbrooke’s has a range of discounted tickets for patients and visitors. Outpatients, day surgery and emergency patients are charged £3.60 for a 24-hour period. An hour’s parking for a visitor costs £2.90.

In addition, patients receiving treatment for two or more consecutive days can get a seven-day ticket for £3.60.

Papworth Hospital made £284,422 from parking charges in 2016/17 – £52,006 higher than 2015/16.

Meanwhile, the hard work of ambulance workers and hospital staff during an incredibly busy festive period has been praised.

The East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) received more than 4,100 calls on New Year’s Eve and 4,800 on New Year’s Day – a 12 per cent increase in demand.

The demand for treatment remains high and people have been urged to call 999 only if is a life-threatening emergency.



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