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Burnside Lakes plan: Campaigners fear 1,000% increase in HGV traffic on Coldham’s Lane in Cambridge from last-mile delivery hub



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More than 60 campaigners in Cambridge protested to proposals for a last mile delivery hub on their doorstep.

The group of residents, who all live close to Coldham’s Lane in Cherry Hinton, spoke of their fear of increased traffic congestion and pollution that would be caused by lorries travelling to and from the hub, part of the Burnside Lakes plans.

Cherry Hinton residents protest against proposal for last mile delivery hub which they say will increase traffic. (48939515)
Cherry Hinton residents protest against proposal for last mile delivery hub which they say will increase traffic. (48939515)

They warned that the impact of more traffic will make the area “even more lethal” to cyclists.

Rev Karin Voth Harman, vicar of St Andrew’s Cherry Hinton, led the protest on Sunday July 4 and acted as spokesperson for the group.

An aerial view of Cambrike Lakes. Picture: Anderson Group/Chetwoods (48360914)
An aerial view of Cambrike Lakes. Picture: Anderson Group/Chetwoods (48360914)

She said: “With a steady stream of HGVs down Cherry Hinton High Street and up Coldham’s Lane, traffic in this part of Cambridge would come to a standstill and the knock on effects of this would reverberate through the city.”

Campaigners claim the developers have admitted to an approximate 1,000 per cent increase in HGV traffic on Coldham’s Lane.

Cherry Hinton residents protest against proposal for last mile delivery hub which they say will increase traffic. (48939484)
Cherry Hinton residents protest against proposal for last mile delivery hub which they say will increase traffic. (48939484)

“The traffic figures they submitted are demonstrably understated. These HGVs would use narrow residential roads, which cyclists already struggle to safely access,” Rev Harman continued.

“Coldham’s Lane will become even more lethal to cyclists than it already is. In so many ways, this development flies in the face of our local cycling agenda, commitment to reduce carbon emissions and efforts to protect green space and biodiversity.

“It will also promote the very industry which is destroying our local shops. It just isn’t Cambridge.

An artist's impression of the commercial area at Cambridge Lakes, showing the cycle route through the site. Picture: Anderson Group/Chetwoods. (48360926)
An artist's impression of the commercial area at Cambridge Lakes, showing the cycle route through the site. Picture: Anderson Group/Chetwoods. (48360926)

“They would increase emissions in the area for decades to come and they would inevitably and irrevocably damage the delicate fabric of our 13th-century church, along with its peaceful ambiance.”

Developer Anderson Group is offering to create a new urban park adjacent to the site which will open access to Cherry Hinton lakes, which were formerly quarries.

An artist's impression of the commercial area at Cambridge Lakes. Picture: Anderson Group/Chetwoods. (48360929)
An artist's impression of the commercial area at Cambridge Lakes. Picture: Anderson Group/Chetwoods. (48360929)

But campaigners warn the lakes are “very deep, very cold and full of rotting machinery and other unknown waste”. They add: “Andersons offer no reassurance that they either know what is in these lakes, or have a plan for dealing with the many risks of opening them up.”

Anderson was approached for comment.

Read more

Urban country park and commercial space plan for east Cambridge lakes unveiled

Burnside Lakes in Cambridge: ‘This won’t be a country park, it’s a concrete park’

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