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Coronavirus in Cambridgeshire: Map shows the number of Covid-19 deaths by Cambridge ward and by villages




New data suggests Covid-19 is claiming more lives in Cambridge’s most deprived wards.

King’s Hedges is the worst affected area of the city, with 10 confirmed deaths from the coronavirus.

In the government’s Indices of Deprivation, it was ranked among the 30 per cent most deprived wards in the country for 2019.

UPDATE: More up to date data and map can be found here

Five people from Arbury have lost their lives to Covid-19. Parts of this area also fell in the 30 per cent most deprived wards, while other parts were in the 50 per cent most deprived.

A map displaying where people who have died from the virus were from was released by the Office for National Statistics on Friday. It does not show the location where someone died and relates to deaths recorded between March 1 and April 17, 2020.

It shows three people from West Chesterton have died, one from East Chesterton, one from Coleridge and one from Cherry Hinton.

There have been no Covid-19 related deaths recorded among people from Central and West Cambridge, which includes Newnham, or in Trumpington, Eddington and Castle, Romsey, East Barnwell and Abbey, Queen Edith’s or Fulbourn and Teversham.

Deprivation is often linked with lower life expectancy. Nationally, analysis of the data has shown that there are 55.1 Covid-19 deaths per 100,000 people in the most deprived areas of England and Wales, compared to 25.3 in more affluent areas.

Health secretary Matt Hancock said: “This is something we are worried about and looking at.”

The data also shows seven people from Bottisham and Swaffham in East Cambridgeshire have died from Covid-19, and three from Burwell, with two more in Haddenham, Stretham and Witchford, and three in Soham. South Ely has recorded one death, and North Ely has recorded two.

In South Cambridgeshire, the data shows one death among people from Histon, Impington and Orchard Park, and one in Longstanton, Swavesey and Over.

Three people from Papworth, Caxton and Fen Drayton have lost their lives to the coronavirus. One person from Cambourne, and four from Hardwick and Highfields have died. Bassingbourn and the Mordens have recorded two, while Girton and Barton have recorded one death, as have Barrington, Orwell and Gamlingay, and Little Shelford, Foxton and Haslingfield.

Sawston has three confirmed deaths, while one person from Duxford, Whittlesford and the Abingtons has died.

Two people from Meldreth, Melbourn and Great Chishill have died from Covid-19, and one from Linton and Balsham.

Among the areas where no people have died from the coronavirus are Milton, Fen Ditton and Quy, Waterbeach and Landbeach, Cottenham, Bar Hill and Boxworth, Willingham and Over, and Great Shelford and Stapleford.

Overall, the county has fared better than many areas, with a rate of 14 deaths per 100,000 in South Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire and Peterborough, and 22 deaths per 100,000 in Cambridge. East Cambridgeshire has recorded 25 deaths per 100,000, while Fenland has recorded 18 deaths per 100,000.

Cambridgeshire’s overall rate is currently 18 deaths per 100,000, as is neighbouring Suffolk’s, but Hertfordshire’s rate is 43 per 100,000 and Essex’s is 33.

The virus is known to affect more men than women, and disproportionately affects older people and those with underlying health conditions. There have also been calls for studies into why people from black and ethnic minority backgrounds appear to be particularly badly affected by the virus.

Read more

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