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Rapid rise in Covid-19 cases in Cambridgeshire and increase in hospitalisations since lifting of restrictions



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The number of confirmed Covid-19 cases in Cambridgeshire has shot up by 43 per cent in a week following the lifting of restrictions.

After several weeks in which cases fell, there was a sharp rise in the week to March 6.

Below we look at how every area is affected, and report the latest figures from our hospitals.

The legal requirement to self-isolate if you test positive for Covid-19 was lifted by the government on February 24, although people with the virus are still encouraged to do so while they test positive.

Since the lifting of restrictions, the number of cases, hospitalisations and deaths is back on the rise across the country, and there is particular concern over a rise in cases among over-55s, many of whom will have waning immunity after receiving boosters months ago.

Amid a population that is now mixing more, the rise of a BA.2 strain of the Omicron variant of Covid-19 could also be a factor in the rise in cases. While it is not believed to be more severe, it is said to be more infectious than the original BA.1 strain.

Nationally, the number of cases has risen 56.3 per cent in a week, hospitalisations are up by 16.9 per cent, and deaths have gone up 2.8 per cent, although hospitalisations and deaths typically lag behind the rise in cases.

In Cambridgeshire, there were 3,919 cases in the week to March 6, up 1,179 (43 per cent) on the previous seven days.

The infection rate is now 596.3 cases per 100,000 people, which is well above the 458.7 rate seen nationally.

Examining the numbers by age shows a rise in cases across most age groups in Cambridgeshire, including among schoolchildren.

The 35-39 and 30-34 age groups have the highest infection rates. In Cambridgeshire, less than half (49.7 per cent) of those aged 30-34 have had a booster jab, along with only 56.4 per cent of those aged 35-39.

As the Cambridge Independent has reported, there is a particular drive to push up vaccination rates in Cambridge, which are far below the county and regional average.

Cambridgeshire, excluding Peterborough, has now recorded:

  • 177,828 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 11, 2022
  • 5,389 in the seven days to March 11 according daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 1,015 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, including one on March 9 and one on March 5
  • 1,189 deaths, as of February 25, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate.

Hospitalisations

Cambridge University Hospitals had 54 patients with Covid-19 patients on its wards on Friday (March 11), compared to 33 the previous Friday. Seven of those were in critical care.

At Royal Papworth, there were 11 Covid-19 patients on March 8, the same number sas a week earlier. Five of them were in ventilation beds.

Vaccinations

Nearly 1.5 million Covid-19 jabs have been administered in Cambridgeshire, with 82.2 per cent of over-12s having received a first dose, 78.1 per cent having had a second and 64.6 per cent having received a third.

Jabs are available on a walk-on basis at all Cambridgeshire’s large-scale vaccination sites.

Booking is available if preferred via www.nhs.uk/covidvaccine.

Cambridge

There were 800 Covid-19 cases in Cambridge in the week to March 6, up 146 (22.3 per cent) on the previous seven days. The infection rate was 639.7 cases per 100,000 people, well above the national average.

Central and West Cambridge, with 85 cases, had the highest number, while Trumpington, with 82, was next.

Cambridge has recorded:

  • 36,612 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 11, 2022
  • 1,063 in the seven days to March 11, according daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 123 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, including one on February 16, on on February 13, one on February 12 and one on February 11
  • 164 deaths, as of February 25, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate.

South Cambridgeshire

The number of confirmed Covid-19 cases shot up by more than a half in a week in South Cambridgeshire.

There were 1,070 in the week to March 6, up 371 (53.1 per cent) on the previous seven days.

Histon, Impington and Orchard Park, with 85 cases, and Hardwick and Highfields, also with 85, were worst hit.

South Cambridgeshire has recorded:

  • 43,567 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 11, 2022
  • 1,432 in the last seven days to March 11, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 206 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, with the latest on March 9
  • 247 deaths, as of February 25, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

East Cambridgeshire

There was an 82.8 per cent rise in Covid-19 cases in a week in East Cambridgeshire, with 594 cases in the seven days to March 6, up 269. This took the infection rate to 658.7 cases per 100,000 people - well above the national average.

North Ely, with 108 cases, up from 67, and Littleport, with 90, up from 38, were worst hit.

East Cambridgeshire has recorded:

  • 22,554 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 11, 2022
  • 838 cases in the seven days to March 11, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 106 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, the latest of which was on February 28
  • 130 deaths, as of February 25, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

Huntingdonshire

Huntingdonshire also witnessed a rapid rise in Covid-19 cases, with 1,027 recorded in the week to March 6, up 380 (58.7 per cent) on the previous week.

The infection rate was 573.8 cases per 100,000 people, above the national average.

Brampton, the Stukeleys and the Alconburys, with 71 cases, up from 42, was the worst hit area, followed by Huntingdon Central and West with 66, up from 42.

Huntingdonshire has recorded:

  • 48,185 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 11, 2022
  • 1,485 cases in the seven days to March 11, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 316 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, with the latest on February 13, 12 and 9
  • 360 deaths, as of February 25, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

Fenland

The lowest rise in cases in Cambridgeshire was found in Fenland, with 428 cases in the week to March 6, up 13 (3.1 per cent). The infection rate was 419.3 cases per 100,000 people, which was below the national average.

With 52 cases each, Whittlesey and Wisbech North were the worst affected.

Fenland has recorded:

  • 26,910 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 11, 2022
  • 571 cases in the seven days to March 11, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 264 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, the latest of which was on March 5
  • 288 deaths, as of February 25, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

Peterborough

Cases rose by nearly a quarter in Peterborough, with 876 in the week to March 6, up 170 or 24.1 per cent on the previous week.

The infection rate of 432.3 cases per 100,000 people was below the national average.

Worst affected was Stanground, with 71 cases, up from 40.

Peterborough has recorded:

  • 67,413 confirmed cases since the pandemic began, as of March 11, 2022
  • 1,166 cases in the seven days to March 11, according to daily case data, which is subject to change
  • 434 deaths by March 11 within 28 days of a positive test, including a death on March 8, two on March 2, one on March 1 and three on February 28
  • 471 deaths, as of February 25, in which Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate

The global picture

Vaccinations by country

Hospitalisations

Variants

Read more

Covid-19 cases in Cambridgeshire fall by a quarter - but county has highest infection rate in the region

Drive to push up below-average Covid-19 vaccination rates in Cambridge

University of Cambridge spin-out DIOSynVax to receive $42m to develop universal coronavirus vaccine



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