Home   News   Article

Stunning images of wild flowers blooming at King’s College, Cambridge




For 300 years, it has been neatly manicured.

Wildflowers growing on the lawn at King's College in Cambridge for the first time in 300 years. Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography (35477929)
Wildflowers growing on the lawn at King's College in Cambridge for the first time in 300 years. Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography (35477929)

But this spring, the most iconic sight in Cambridge has been transformed, after King’s College allowed wild flowers to bloom on one of its famous lawns. Harebells, buttercups, poppies and cornflowers are now blooming in the spring sunshine in front of the college’s historic chapel.

The University of Cambridge college, which dates back to 1441 and has mown the lawn since the 1720s, has also taken down the ‘Keep off the grass’ signs.

Wildflowers growing on the lawn at King's College in Cambridge for the first time in 300 years. Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography (35478161)
Wildflowers growing on the lawn at King's College in Cambridge for the first time in 300 years. Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography (35478161)

Announcing plans to create a wildflower meadow in January, head gardener Steve Coghill said: “The thing about gardening in the 21st century is that you need to be able to justify what you are doing. Grass monocultures have their place in horticulture but biodiversity does too. And in a time of climate change and fear of loss of species it is becoming more important.

“We are taking over a third of the lawn, from the chapel to the River Cam, so it is a sizeable chunk.

Wildflowers growing on the lawn at King's College in Cambridge for the first time in 300 years. Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography (35478259)
Wildflowers growing on the lawn at King's College in Cambridge for the first time in 300 years. Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography (35478259)

“We are very lucky that we have a very forward-thinking garden committee and fellowship because you can only do these things if the college is in accord.”

The wildflowers will be harvested for hay when they have finished flowering, and the lawn mown once more. But the wild flowers will return next spring.

The initiative was the brainchild of fellow Geoff Moggridge.

These stunning pictures were taken by Geoff Robinson Photography.

Read more

‘We need to change our relationship with nature’ says Over-based wildlife writer

Increasing Cambridge's tree canopy and the great ash hunt



More by this author


This website and its associated newspaper are members of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO)



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More