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Vigil remembers murdered student Giulio three years on




The vigil for Giulio Regeni outside Great St Mary's Church. Picture: Keith Heppell
The vigil for Giulio Regeni outside Great St Mary's Church. Picture: Keith Heppell

A vigil was held in Cambridge last week to mark three years since university student Giulio Regeni disappeared in Egypt.

Candles were lit outside Great St Mary’s Church on Friday for the Italian student who was found murdered nine days later on February 3, 2016.

The city’s MP Daniel Zeichner attended the vigil, but also raised Giulio’s case in Parliament, asking for the government to reveal what it has done to put pressure on the Egyptian authorities to find out the truth about what happened to Giulio.

A campaigner speaks at the Giulio Regeni vigil. Picture: Keith Heppell
A campaigner speaks at the Giulio Regeni vigil. Picture: Keith Heppell

“Three years ago, University of Cambridge PhD researcher Giulio Regeni went missing in Cairo while undertaking academic research,” said Mr Zeichner. “Just over a week later, his body was found on the outskirts of the city, showing signs of torture.

“Giulio’s death was nothing less than an obscene and heinous crime and those responsible must be held accountable.

“I am calling on the government again to assure me that they are exerting pressure on the Egyptian authorities to find out the truth about what happened to Giulio.”

Following the death, a ‘Truth for Giulio Regeni’ campaign was set up by Amnesty International. "We must have answers and justice for Giulio," said Sue Woodsford of Cambridge City Amnesty.

A Foreign Office statement condemned "the brutal manner of his killing" and said it remained "in contact with the authorities of Italy and Egypt".

Giulio Regeni had travelled to Egypt to research the country’s trade unions and labour rights as part of his PhD work - a sensitive topic for Egypt's authorities in recent years. After going missing his mutilated body was found ten days later in a ditch outside Cairo. No charges have yet been brought against those responsible. Picture: Keith Heppell
Giulio Regeni had travelled to Egypt to research the country’s trade unions and labour rights as part of his PhD work - a sensitive topic for Egypt's authorities in recent years. After going missing his mutilated body was found ten days later in a ditch outside Cairo. No charges have yet been brought against those responsible. Picture: Keith Heppell


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