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Watch live as SpaceX launches its tenth Starlink mission, sending 59 satellites into orbit




UPDATE: The mission has been stood down due to bad weather and a new target launch date will be announced.

SpaceX is launching its tenth Starlink mission today (Wednesday July 8) - and you can watch it live here.

Elon Musk’s private space company will send 57 Starlink satellites and two satellites from Blacksky, a Spaceflight customer, into orbit.

A Falcon 9 rocket is due to lift-off at 3.59pm British time from Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It is the latest launch to deploy an enormous network of 12,000 satellites that will ultimately provide global broadband.

And it follows a mission in which a Falcon 9 was used to launch Crew Dragon on their way to the International Space Station.

SpaceX says the BlackSky Global spacecraft will deploy sequentially one hour and one minute after lift-off, while the Starlink satellites will deploy approximately one hour and 32 minutes after lift-off.

Following stage separation, Falcon 9’s first stage will land on the ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean.

The Starlink satellites would, in theory, be visible later tonight from the UK, but cloudy conditions appear to have foiled hopes of that.

Many skywatchers have been looking out for the Starlink ‘chain of lights’ in the sky.

A composite shot showing the trails of light from Starlink satellites. Picture: James Billings - https://www.facebook.com/JamesBillingsPhoto/
A composite shot showing the trails of light from Starlink satellites. Picture: James Billings - https://www.facebook.com/JamesBillingsPhoto/

But astronomers have been concerned about the visual impact of the enormous network on their observations and imaging.

In response, all Starlink satellites on this flight are equipped with a deployable visor to block sunlight from hitting the brightest spots of the spacecraft. SpaceX said this was part of its “work with leading astronomical groups to mitigate satellite reflectivity”.

The webcast is due to begin 15 minutes before lift-off.

Read more

Watch SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft dock with the International Space Station - and hear from NASA astronauts



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