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A man holding up an elephant and a dancing group: Stunning new Bushra Fakhoury sculptures in Hills Road, Cambridge explained




Hills Road in Cambridge has become home to two new sculptures from renowned artist Bushra Fakhoury that each tell a story.

Bushra Fakoury and her sculpture Dunamis on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell
Bushra Fakoury and her sculpture Dunamis on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell

Dunamis, which means “power from above”, can be found at Academy House, 136 Hills Road, and features a man holding up an elephant. “It symbolises the human struggle to achieve excellence, pushing boundaries to make the impossible possible. We need to prioritise, work positively and relentlessly towards reaching our goals and dreams,” explains Bushra.

“Holding the elephant in a high position pays homage to the traits that we share and gradually forget, such as family ties, solidarity, compassion and co-operation.” The figure’s ‘pointy hat’ represents knowledge through the ages.

Bushra Fakhoury and her sculpture Dunamis on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell
Bushra Fakhoury and her sculpture Dunamis on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell

“We may not have the extraordinary memory of the elephant,” says Bushra, “but we need to remember to support the survival of endangered species.”

The other sculpture is Danse Gwenedour, which means a “celebration of life”. The 7m high sculpture was inspired by the dance performed by French villagers in Bretagne, and can be found at City House, 126-130 Hills Road.

Bushra Fakhoury and her sculpture Danse Gwenedour on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell
Bushra Fakhoury and her sculpture Danse Gwenedour on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell

Bushra has been sculpting since the age of seven and has been influenced by living in countries including the Ivory Coast, France, Kenya and Lebanon. She is inspired by myths, fables, folklore, carnivals, parades and by observing and studying people in daily life.

Danse Gwenedour on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell
Danse Gwenedour on Hill's Road. Picture: Keith Heppell

Bushra, who now lives in London, told the Cambridge Independent: “I do all the work myself; you can see me working on my sculptures on YouTube. Catto Gallery, which represents world-class artists, found the buyer for both these sculptures.”

Bushra Fakhoury and her sculpture Danse Gwenedour on Hills Road. Picture: Keith Heppell
Bushra Fakhoury and her sculpture Danse Gwenedour on Hills Road. Picture: Keith Heppell

For more on Bushra, go to bfakhoury.com.

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